Looking at a Hardwood Floor

main_bamboak

Australia is lucky to have many quality hardwoods available. As locals we can buy these at a reasonable price as there is minimal transportation cost. These hardwoods have the advantage of being extremely durable – they will last for decades.

 

Hardness

As almost any Australian timber is well above average hardness there is little need to choose with durability in mind. As all these timbers will last for decades the choice of timber can be based on aesthetics. For extremely hard wearing situations, perhaps where large families play indoor contact sports, Ironbark timber is probably the hardest option available. Most other situations can concentrate on appearance and grain.

 

Grade

The grade of wood is not an indication of the quality, but of the visibility of the grain. The three grade categories are classic, natural and rustic (AKA as classic, standard and Australiana). The final category has the highest visibility of grain, which some individuals prefer. As long as all the timber in a floor has the same grain the choice is a matter of individual preference.

 

Solid Hardwood Flooring

This has tongue and groove along the sides, allowing the individual planks to fit together neatly. Because only one type of wood is used there can be problems with expansion and contraction over time, especially if moisture levels fluctuate. Letting the timber age properly can drastically reduce this problem, as can proper installation. Planks do better is well nailed and spaced slightly.

 

Engineered Hardwood

This combines several layers of hardwood, with a pleasing looking veneer on the upper surface level. Because the layers of wood have their grains angled crossways the expansion and contraction issues are negligible.

This type of floor can use any appealing type of wood for the top layer, while still maintaining excellent stability. It is even suitable for installation over underfloor heating systems.

 

Engineered floors can be re-sanded, lest the laminate be removed by the process. Yet this should never really be necessary; the floors last for decades.

Posted in blog.